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Canon G10 Gallery
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October 2008       Canon G10 Review        More Canon Reviews

These are some snaps I made in California's Eastern Sierra and Yosemite National Park between October 16th and 22nd, 2008, while instructing with two workshops.

Each of these images are exactly as they came from the Canon G10 as JPGs. Of course they've been resized to fit your screen and branded, and other than that, they have not been cropped, adjusted, spotted, edited, or anything. This is exactly what I got out of the G10, just smaller to fit your screen. Since I made all these images the same width to fit the page, vertical shots are much taller than horizontal shots.

Of course I made plenty of adjustments in-camera to get these results. I adjusted the exposure compensation (the knob on the top left) as needed, usually at -2/3, and set the colors to VIVID (press FUNC, click down one to OFF, click one right to VIVID), and I often used cloudy or custom white balances. I emphasize oranges by using a very warm WB preset (the two ramps with a dot in the middle) which I set to a white table that was lit by open shade early in the morning.

Lee Vining Market

Lee Vining Market at Dawn.

 

Convict Lake

Convict Lake Marina.

 

Bodie

Bodie. The curvature on the right is normal for the G10's lens at its widest setting.

 

Pump Head

Gas Pump Head, Bodie.

 

Lee Vining Creek

Lee Vining Creek.

 

South Tufa

South Tufa.

I used the Canon G10's built-in flash, and had to piddle quite a few times with manual ambient and flash exposure settings to get the light to balance.

 

South Tufa

South Tufa.

 

South Tufa

South Tufa. I again used the G10's flash.

 

South Tufa

South Tufa.

The interesting colors are caused from the wild light that happens about 15 minutes before sunup. Volcanic ash currently circling the globe gives us extra magenta before sunrise, which dissipates as sunrise approaches more closely. We only get light like this about every 10-20 years, depending on when we get cataclysmic volcanic eruptions.

 

South Tufa

Moon and Tufa.

 

Silver Lake

Silver Lake.

 

Bodie

Bodie. The building really is falling over; it's not the lens.

 

Olmstead Poin

Olmstead Point.

I used the Canon G10's flash to fill in the shadows, and my custom WB to emphasize orange. OK, I did more than emphasize the orange, I forced the blue-gray rocks to become as orange as I wanted them by using my home-grown shade setting, set off a white table in the open shade.

 

Tuolumne Meadows

Tuolumne Meadows.

Wonder how sharp this is for gallery exhibition? Here's an unsharpened crop from the top left of the original file at 100%. If you print the entire image at this magnification, you'll have a 45 x 33" (115 x 85cm) print.

Tuolumne Meadows

Tuolumne Meadows, crop from 45 x 33" (115 x 85cm) print of above.

 

FireFall

Firefall.

 

Maple

Sugar Maple.

 

Lodge

Yosemite Lodge.

 

Meadow

Yosemite Valley.

Ouch! The default sharpening I use when resizing photos for the web caused the bright lines around the branches; it's not the Canon G10. The G10's six-bladed diaphragm does cause the six-pointed sunstars, and that is a flare blob from the blinding morning sun. I wanted it that way to emphasize the brightness, otherwise its a dull photo.

 

El Cap

El Capitan Meadow.

 

El Cap

El Capitan Meadow. Backlighting intensifies colors.

 

Chapel

Chapel.

 

Maple

Sugar Maple (across the street from the chapel).

 

Meadow

View from the former home of the Superintendent. (web sharpening caused the halos, not the G10.)

 

Forresta

Barn. Again, the Canon G10's six-bladed diaphragm causes six-pointed stars on brilliant points of light.

 

Half Dome

Half Dome after Sunset.

Volcanic ash in the upper atmosphere caused these colors. The color was gray right after sunset, and this is what happens 15 minutes later.

Like most of the shots on this page, this was made hand-held and used the G10's default image stabilization. I braced the G10 on a rock, and this 1-second exposure was sharp! Tripods are for wimps, or for film cameras.

 

PLUG

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